Moving to France after Brexit – Your guide to visas, residency and healthcare

As Brexit becomes a reality, many UK citizens are considering their options for relocating to Europe. France is a popular destination for its culture, climate and lifestyle, but what does it take to actually make the move? In this guide, we will cover the key aspects of moving to France after Brexit, including visas, residency, and healthcare. Whether you are planning a permanent move or just looking to spend some time abroad, this guide will provide you with the information you need to make an informed decision. So, let’s get started!

1. Introduction: Moving to France after Brexit
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1. Introduction: Moving to France after Brexit

Moving to France after Brexit can be a complex and daunting process, which is why this guide aims to provide a comprehensive overview of visas, residency, and healthcare requirements for British citizens.

With the UK officially leaving the European Union, British citizens now have to meet new visa and residence requirements to move and settle in France. In addition to this, the impact of Brexit on Britons already living in France needs to be taken into account when assessing the situation. Furthermore, work visas come with eligibility criteria that must be met, and all British citizens will need to apply for new residency status in France. Long-stay visas and French healthcare are also important considerations for those planning to move to France.

It’s essential to understand the post-Brexit changes for British citizens and how driving, housing, and property ownership in France are affected. By navigating these complexities and following this guide, moving to France after Brexit can be achieved successfully.

2. New visa and residence requirements for British citizens
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2. New visa and residence requirements for British citizens

Moving to France as a British citizen has become a little more complicated since Brexit. Now, UK citizens planning to reside in France for more than three months must obtain a residency permit. There are two types of residency permits: a five-year permit for individuals residing in France for less than five years and a ten-year permit for those who have been in France for more than five years. If you plan to remain in France after June 2021, you will need to obtain a new residence status to secure your rights.

To enter France as a UK citizen after Brexit, you will not require a visa for stays of up to 90 days. However, for long-term stays in excess of 90 days, you must obtain a long-stay visa before departing the UK. This visa is generally valid for 12 months and allows you to live and work in France, depending on the visa type granted.

For British citizens moving to France, a French residency permit is mandatory. This permit, also known as a carte de séjour, allows you to remain in France for more than three months. To obtain the permit, you must provide evidence of your income, proof of health insurance, and a valid passport. It is recommended that you start the application process as soon as you arrive in France as the process can take up to six months to complete.

Overall, Moving to France after Brexit requires careful planning and preparation. Ensuring you meet residency requirements, obtaining a long-stay visa, and obtaining a French residency permit are all essential steps to take. Once these items are in order, you can begin navigating the complexities of living in France and making the most of your new home in Europe.

3. Impact of Brexit on Britons already living in France
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3. Impact of Brexit on Britons already living in France

For Britons who were already living in France before Brexit, there are a few key impacts to be aware of. Firstly, if you were living in France before January 1st, 2021, you have until June 30th, 2021 to apply for a Withdrawal Agreement residency permit. This permit will allow you to continue living and working in France, as well as accessing healthcare and other benefits.

There may also be changes to your healthcare coverage, with many Britons previously covered by the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) now having to seek alternative healthcare options. It is important to check with the French healthcare system (CPAM) to ensure you are still covered.

Another potential impact of Brexit is on your financial arrangements. If you receive a UK state pension, you may face changes to the way it is paid and taxed, and you may also need to declare any income from UK sources to the French authorities.

It is also worth noting that Brexit may have an impact on your ability to travel easily between France and other European countries. While it is still possible to travel, there may be changes to visa requirements or border controls, so it is important to stay up to date with any developments.

Overall, while Brexit may have some impacts on Britons already living in France, it is important to remember that it is still possible to continue living and enjoying life in this beautiful country. By staying informed and proactive about your residency, healthcare, and financial arrangements, you can navigate the complexities of Brexit and continue to thrive in France.

4. Work visas and eligibility criteria
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4. Work visas and eligibility criteria

In order to work in France after Brexit, British citizens must obtain the appropriate work visa. The eligibility criteria for the work visa vary depending on the type of job and industry. It takes approximately five business days for the government to grant the work permit after submission of the application, so it is important to plan ahead. In addition to the work visa, a labor card and residence visa are also required to obtain a work permit. It is recommended to research the requirements and procedures before applying to ensure a smooth process. It is also recommended to seek assistance from the Visa Assistant service provided by France-visas to determine the appropriate visa for the trip. Once the work visa is obtained, the individual can apply for new residency status through the appropriate channels. French healthcare is available for those who have obtained long-stay visas. Moving to France after Brexit can be a complex process, but with careful planning and preparation, it can be navigated successfully.

5. Residence permits: applying for new residency status
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5. Residence permits: applying for new residency status

UK nationals who want to move to France after Brexit need to apply for new residency status. This residency permit, known as “Art 50 EUV,” is issued by the competent Settlement and Immigration Office in France. The permit can be valid for five years if the UK citizen has lived in France for less than five years, and for ten years if they have lived in France for more than five years.

The first step to obtaining a residency permit is to create an account on the online portal designed for UK nationals to apply specifically for this permit. The application process requires UK citizens to provide evidence of their status as residents in France, such as a rental agreement or utility bills.

It’s important to note that applying for residency just to get around the Schengen area limitations for UK nationals is not legal. The residency permit must be obtained with the genuine intention of living in France. A valid passport is also required throughout the application process.

Although the process may seem daunting, it’s essential for UK nationals who want to settle in France after Brexit to obtain the residency permit as soon as possible. The permit will not only allow UK citizens to live and work in France but also to access the country’s healthcare system.

In conclusion, understanding the requirements and documentation for obtaining a residency permit is crucial for UK nationals looking to move to France after Brexit. It’s important to start the process as soon as possible to ensure a smooth transition and avoid any issues with French authorities.

6. Long-stay visas and French healthcare
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6. Long-stay visas and French healthcare

If you’re planning on moving to France after Brexit for more than three months, you will need to apply for a long-stay visa, also known as a visitor visa. This visa is valid for stays up to 12 months and can be renewed once expired. It is essential to note that if you spend more than six months a year in France, you will be considered a French resident and must apply for a long-stay visitor visa.

To obtain a long-stay visa, you’ll need to provide proof of income, accommodation, and healthcare insurance. The French government provides healthcare coverage to its citizens through a public healthcare system, and non-EU citizens are obligated to obtain healthcare insurance for themselves.

Retired EU/EEA or Swiss citizens are exempt from obtaining a residence permit but can request one if they want full access to state healthcare. On the other hand, non-EU citizens intending on moving to France must first apply for a visa before enrolling in healthcare coverage.

Applying for a long-stay visa and navigating the French healthcare system can seem daunting, but there are numerous resources available to guide you through the process. It’s always best to consult with an immigration lawyer or an experienced expatriate to ensure all your paperwork and documentation is in order before moving to France.

Remember that healthcare is a fundamental aspect of life, and being properly insured in France not only ensures access to healthcare services but also provides peace of mind.

7. Post-Brexit changes for British citizens in France
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7. Post-Brexit changes for British citizens in France

The United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union has brought significant changes for British citizens residing in France. As mentioned earlier, UK nationals are no longer eligible for EU citizen rights, which means that there are quite a few post-Brexit changes that they must be aware of.

Firstly, healthcare access for Britons in France has been affected. Previously, British citizens had access to healthcare through the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC), which provided medical cover for those studying, working, or visiting the EU. However, after Brexit, UK nationals can no longer use the EHIC, and instead, they need to get private health insurance or register under the French national health insurance scheme.

Secondly, British citizens residing in France must expect slower processing times for some of their documents, such as residence permits or driving licenses. Post-Brexit, the French government has implemented new procedures and requirements for UK nationals wishing to stay in the country longer than three months. This means that the application process for residence permits will take longer, with additional checks being carried out by the authorities.

Lastly, as the UK is no longer part of the EU, British citizens in France can no longer vote in any EU elections or hold positions of power. However, they can still vote in the local elections in France and for the mayors in their communes.

Overall, it’s essential that British citizens residing in France are aware of these post-Brexit changes to navigate the complexities of living in France successfully. By understanding the new visa and residency requirements, eligibility criteria for work visas, and changes to healthcare access and political standing, UK nationals can continue living in France without issues.

8. Driving in France as a British citizen
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8. Driving in France as a British citizen

When it comes to driving in France as a British citizen, there are some important things to keep in mind. To begin with, you must be 18 years old and have a valid UK driving license, insurance, and vehicle documents. Although an additional IDP (International Driving Permit) is not necessary to drive in France, it is recommended that you carry one alongside your driver’s license.

Brexit has brought some important changes to driving in France, but British citizens can still drive their vehicles in mainland Europe. If you plan to drive your British vehicle in the EU, you will need to display a ‘UK’ sticker on the rear of your car to replace the EU symbol. Additionally, it is mandatory to carry your passport, certificate of insurance, and original vehicle registration document or vehicle on hire certificate while driving.

It’s important to note that French driving laws may differ from those in the UK. Speed limits are in kilometers per hour, and many French towns and cities have low-emission zones that require specific vehicle emissions stickers to be displayed. So, it’s advisable to check the specific driving requirements of France before setting off on your journey.

Lastly, if you plan to settle in France after the end of the transition period, exchanging your British driving license for a French license will be necessary. A full and valid UK driver’s license will still allow you to drive in all European Union countries, including France, but if you plan to reside in France for an extended period, obtaining a French license will be required.

In summary, while Brexit has brought some updates to driving in France, British citizens can still drive their vehicles in the EU. To ensure a smooth journey, following French driving laws and carrying the required documents is necessary.

9. Housing and property in France
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9. Housing and property in France

If you are planning to move to France after Brexit, you will need to consider housing and property options. France has a wide range of properties available for purchase, from small apartments to grand chateaux. If you plan on using the property as a second home, there are no restrictions on the type of property you can purchase. However, if you plan on using the property as your permanent residence, you will need to obtain the right to live in France.

Once you have decided on the type of property you want to purchase, you will need to obtain a French mortgage if you are unable to finance the purchase with cash. French mortgages are available to British citizens, and it’s worth seeking guidance and advice from a reputable mortgage broker to ensure you get the best deal.

If you plan on renting a property in France, it’s important to note that the rules for tenancy agreements are different in France than in the UK. You will need to agree on a ‘bail’ (lease) and be aware of the notice period and penalties for breaking the agreement.

Another important consideration is property tax. As a non-resident property owner, you will be liable for French property tax, which is calculated on the value of the property. French property tax is payable annually and managed by the local tax office.

When it comes to real estate agents, it’s important to choose a reputable and licensed agent. Always check the credentials of any agent you intend to work with and ensure they are registered with the relevant professional bodies.

In summary, purchasing property in France can be a complex process, but with the right support and guidance, it can be a worthwhile investment. It’s important to research the market thoroughly, seek legal and financial advice, and work with reputable estate agents to ensure a smooth and successful purchase.

10. Conclusion: Navigating the complexities of moving to France after Brexit
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10. Conclusion: Navigating the complexities of moving to France after Brexit

Moving to France after Brexit can be a complex process, with new visa and residence requirements for British citizens. Work visas and eligibility criteria have also changed, and getting the necessary documentation can be challenging. However, with careful planning and research, the transition can be smoother.

One crucial step is applying for new residency status and residence permits. The French healthcare system is one of the best in the world, but it is essential to understand the requirements for legal residents and non-EU citizens, including those who are now British citizens after Brexit.

Another aspect to consider is driving in France. British citizens must ensure they have the required documentation and understand the differences in driving laws and regulations.

Housing and property in France can also be tricky to navigate, especially for those unfamiliar with the market. Researching the areas and getting professional advice can help find the right property and avoid any pitfalls in the process.

In conclusion, moving to France after Brexit requires careful research and planning. Understanding the new requirements and seeking professional advice can make the process less daunting. With patience and preparation, a successful move to France is possible.